Rooney_Sarah-2015-001

SARAH ROONEY, Assistant Professor

Sarah Rooney, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

304 Spencer Lab
Newark, DE 19711
P: 302-831-4778
E: sirooney@udel.edu

 

EDUCATION

  • Ph.D. in Bioengineering, 2015, University of Pennsylvania
  • M.Sc. in Biomedical Engineering, 2010, University of Michigan
  • B.S. in Biomedical Engineering, 2009, University of Michigan

RESEARCH AREAS

  • Musculoskeletal Biomechanics
  • Exercise Physiology
  • Engineering Education

AREAS OF SPECIAL INTEREST

Dr. Rooney’s scientific research background has focused on musculoskeletal injury mechanisms and the beneficial and detrimental adaptations of tissue to load. In particular, she has studied how muscle and tendon respond biologically and mechanically to acute and chronic exercise and the effects of the commonly used pharmaceuticals ibuprofen and doxycycline on these tissues.  Her work aimed to provide a foundation to answer the bigger question, “How does exercise go from good to bad?”  In addition to scientific research, Dr. Rooney has an interest in enhancing engineering education and bringing evidence-based teaching practices to the classroom.  Specifically, she has incorporated active-learning techniques and helped to develop the skills of teaching assistants for active classes.

 

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

  1. Rooney SI, McGurk JS, Elliott ER, Dourte Segan LM. Facilitating the Transition of a Traditional Engineering Course to a Structured, Active, In-Class Learning Environment as a Teaching Assistant. 122nd Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education, Seattle, WA, 2015.
  2. Rooney SI, Loro E, Sarver JJ, Peltz CD, Hast MW, Tseng W-J, Kuntz AF, Liu XS, Khurana TS, Soslowsky LJ. Exercise Protocol Induces Muscle, Tendon, and Bone Adaptations in the Rat Shoulder. Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal, 2014; 4(4):413-419.
  3. Thomas SJ, Reuther KE, Tucker JJ, Sarver JJ, Yannascoli SM, Caro CC, Voleti PB, Rooney SI, Glaser DL, Soslowsky LJ. Biceps Detachment Decreases Joint Damage in a Rotator Cuff Tear Rat Model. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 2014 Aug; 472(8):2404-12.
  4. Reuther KE, Thomas SJ, Tucker JJ, Sarver JJ, Gray CF, Rooney SI, Glaser DL, Soslowsky LJ. Disruption of the Anterior-Posterior Rotator Cuff Force Balance Alters Joint Function and Leads to Joint Damage in a Rat Model. Journal of Orthopaedic Research, 2014 May; 32(5):638-44.
  5. Ilkhani-Pour S, Dunkman AA, Solsowsky LJ. (2013) “The Basic Science of Rotator Cuff Tendons and Healing.” In G.P. Nicholson (Ed), Orthopaedic Knowledge Update: Shoulder and Elbow 4 (pp. 13-29). Rosemont, IL: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.